A Fussy Eater Abroad: surviving Prague

Prague’s a pushover

As travel destinations go, Prague is not a tricky one to survive as a fussy eater. It’s a tourist hotspot so just about every taste is catered for.

In the most touristy areas such as the Old Town, it’s hard to come by traditional Czech food. The grandiose street are dominated by a mix of Turkish street vendors, American theme bars, curry houses and steak restaurants. If you like meat, cheese, or eggs, you shouldn’t have a problem anywhere, but there are vegetarian, and vegan friendly places too.

Omlette that is in fact, just several fried eggs.

“Egg Omlette Grandma’s Style”

The trusty omlette – like many European countries, the Czechs love their red meat and cheese. If that’s not for you then you may end up eating a few of these. ‘Grandma’s style’ is essentially chunks of potato nestling within some fried eggs.

Czech Goulash with Bread Dumplings

Czech Goulash with Bread Dumplings

Beef Guláš – tender, if a little fatty (so I’m told), beef goulash, a dish borrowed from the Hungarians. Bread dumplings however, or knedliky, are a traditional Czech side dish made from wheat or potato flour, boiled in water as a roll, then sliced and served hot. They’re quite doughy, but good for soaking up the tasty rich sauce.

Time For Tea

It can get pretty chilly in the Czech Republic (my whole face was chapped for a week) so hot drinks are a must and, well, GREAT!

Take a break from the cold in a swanky bar, or just warm your hands on a cup of something cheeky from a street vendor.

Hot Wine

Hot Wine

Hot wine – another delicacy shared with the Hungarians and almost worth a city break alone. It’s simpler and less sickly than mulled wine. I’ve found a recipe for it here, but it won’t taste as good without the dramatic gothic architecture.

Hot cherry or apple – fruit liqueurs with hot water.

Hot cider – I’m sure you can figure that one out.

Grog

Grog

Grog – rum, hot water and a squeeze of lemon or orange. This is quite strong and varies in taste depending on the rum used, it’s usually pretty horrible.

Hot milk with a lump of chocolate to melt on a stick

Hot Chocolate On A Stick

Hot chocolate – familiar to us all, but have you ever had it with a tot of amaretto or rum, or more bizarrely, on a stick?

* If your thinking of heading to Prague I’d suggest a cheap deal that will take you there out of season (some time around January). Not only will you save a lot of money, you’ll avoid marauding Stags and Hens, but no matter when you go you will get hassled by promo teams.

Wrapped mints named Bye Polar

Feeling a bit menthol

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8 thoughts on “A Fussy Eater Abroad: surviving Prague

      • Not so much with the drinks, it usually has to do with flavor. I dislike pulp in my juice but I mostly got over it when I had my giant tonsils removed 11 years ago.

        I stopped eating meat when I was 6 or 7, it had whittled down to just crispy bacon and I figured “what’s the point?” I have pondered trying it again from time to time. Most likely, I’ll try fish then fowl, but will probably never go back to red meat.

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      • That’s odd, do you know why your tonsils would have effected the way you feel about flavour?

        I’ve been learning to like fish, it’s not easy but it makes me feel really good when I’ve cleaned my plate (except for the skin). Have you tried fish at all yet? I never in a million years thought that I would be able to even sit near it!

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